bakethatlinguist:

papershopprojects:

huffingtonpost:

HERE’S WHAT ‘YELLOW FEVER’ REALLY MEANS

"All my ex-girlfriends are Asian."

If you’ve ever come across this charming come-on, you’ve probably been exposed to yellow fever

For her full commentary watch the video here.

YES, THERE IS NOW A MUCH NEEDED GIF SET FOR THIS!

I removed the word rant from the link, because I felt it dismissive of what she was actually trying to communicate. 

You see, no one ever tells you that true empowerment comes from giving yourself the permission to think and act. Empowerment is often made to sound as if it’s an ideal, it’s a wonderful outcome. When we talk about empowerment, we often talk about giving people access to materials, giving them access to tools. But the thing is, empowerment is an emotion. It’s a feeling. The first step to empowerment is to give yourself the authority, the key to independent will, and for women everywhere, no matter who we are or where we come from, that is the most difficult step. We fear the sound of our own voice, for it means admission, but it is this that gives us the power to change our environment.

wocinsolidarity:

albinwonderland:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Aboriginal women ask Stephen Harper: Am I next?

Am I next?

That’s the question aboriginal women are asking Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a new online campaign to renew pressure on his government to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

Coming on the heels of Harper’s "sociological phenomenon" blunder, the campaign is the brainchild of Holly Jarrett. She’s the cousin of Loretta Saunders, a 26-year-old Inuit student at Saint Mary’s University who was murdered earlier this year. At the time of her death, Saunders was working on her thesis on murdered and missing aboriginal women.

"She had come through a lot of the same kind of struggles that a lot women affected by colonialism and residential school stuff," Jarrett told PressProgress Friday, a day after  launching the Am I Next campaign.

"We wanted to move it forward for her. She was really passionate about telling her story, to stand up and tell the brutal truth," said Jarrett, an Inuit from the Labrador coast who’s now based in Hamilton, Ont.

After organizing one of the largest petitions at change.org calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into hundreds of missing and murdered aboriginal women, Jarrett decided to launch the Am I Next campaign.

It’s inspired by the Inuktitut word ain, a term of endearment for someone you love in her native language.

Here are some of the faces of the viral campaign:

This is what comes to mind when people try to tell me there is no (or less) racism in Canada. Hundreds of aboriginal and First Nations women are missing, abused, and murdered, and our country and GOVERNMENT doesn’t care. It doesn’t. Indigenous women don’t matter to our government and it’s horrifying.  Please click some of the above mentioned links and learn about these women and this campaign. 

PLEASE SHARE

fuckyeahsouthasia:

 Photographer Shoots Straight People To Show There Is Nothing Weird About Homosexuality

Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code makes homosexuality illegal. It criminalizes sexual activities which are ‘against the order of nature’.

But what is so unnatural about having lovers of the same sex?

When a guy and a girl are involved in everyday activities, it doesn’t seem weird. Because apparently it is not ‘against the order of nature.’

In these photographs, the participants are straight. But when they are involved in intimate everyday activity, why does it suddenly seem so repulsive to some people?

The concept of this project is that gender is not related to intimacy or lust. Emotions exist in their purest form without gender or sex.

Sexuality or physicality merely gives emotions a form. It has nothing to do with sexual orientation or preference.

'The photographs depict souls belonging to bodies, not to any orientation.'
These photographs were taken by Aritra Sarkar and exhibited at FTII, Pune. All photographs were taken in absolute minimum lighting conditions using a 600D without any post production. You can check out the complete blog here.

humansofnewyork:

"When I got accepted into the Master’s program at the University of Damascus, it felt like the whole world was in my hands. For the last three weeks before the exam, I studied for 20 hours every day. My eyes got so tired and swollen that I could not see the letters anymore. So when I heard that I passed, I felt that nothing was impossible. All my friends and family were surrounding me and kissing me.""How did you celebrate?""Well, we were poor. So I bought a Pepsi to share with my friends." (Erbil, Iraq)

humansofnewyork:

"When I got accepted into the Master’s program at the University of Damascus, it felt like the whole world was in my hands. For the last three weeks before the exam, I studied for 20 hours every day. My eyes got so tired and swollen that I could not see the letters anymore. So when I heard that I passed, I felt that nothing was impossible. All my friends and family were surrounding me and kissing me."
"How did you celebrate?"
"Well, we were poor. So I bought a Pepsi to share with my friends." 
(Erbil, Iraq)